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The Hesston Record
347 B Old Hwy 81
Hesston, KS 67062
(620) 327-4831

This Week's Issue:

Hesston Record 10.16


Hesston Record 10.16

Whitestone Celebrates Half A Century Of Heritage

Posted 10/16/2014

By Jackie Nelson

Whitestone Mennonite Church, one of the most histories churches in Hesston, is celebrating its 50th anniversary as Whitestone Mennonite Church at the Hesston sanctuary. 

Founded in 1885 by early Mennonite settlers, the Pennsylvania Mennonite Church met for the first time in their own sanctuary in January of 1887 in Zimmerdale. 

After nearly a century meeting at a church without running water or adequate room for a growing congregation, church elders met to discuss building a new church within the city of Hesston – a rapidly growing community where many congregants called home. 

Rev. Donald King spurred the congregation forward to relocate their church to continue growing.  

In an interview published Dec. 31, 1964 in the Mennonite Weekly Review, King said, “There is a real future for a growing church here and a real need for its ministry.  The rural nature of the church had kept it from growing the past 40 years.”   

While the motivation for moving to Hesston from the country was growth, the congregation faced challenges and several families abandon the church. 

To read more see this weeks print edition

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The Psychology Behind Bullying, Victimization And Recovery

Posted 10/16/2014

By Jackie Nelson

In part two of our series on bullying, The Record had the opportunity to meet with Dr. Faye Koop, owner and operator of Eastview Counseling, and received information via Q&A with Dr. Deborah Ellerbusch, LP-T, a clinical psychologist specializing in child, adolescent and family therapy at Prairie View. This week we are exploring the psychology behind bullying, the effects on victims and how parents can assist children being targeted and those who are acting out. Dr. Faye Koop, a clinician running a private practice in Newton, said she has seen children and youth of all ages working through bullying situations. “The imbalance of power creates a bullying situation. One preys on the less popular or younger children. Some use the internet. It is more than a difference in perspective. Bullying happens more than once,” she said. Koop said for children who report bullying to an adult, the impact of the bullying can be lessened. However, Koop said the negative impact of bullying can be severe, depending on the child. “If the incident is fairly traumatic, it can be likened to PTSD. It can be a trauma situation. Now, I’m not saying it is PTSD. Sometimes it depends on the self-esteem or individual strength of the person. Bullies can figure out who these people are and they still have the strength to tell an adult, and that is a good thing for those kids,” she said. There are some children and adolescents that suffer in silence, not reaching out to an adult. Without early intervention, Koop said a child on the receiving end of bullying behavior can begin to lose. “Some can’t tell. They are the ones that endure and don’t have as much support and that can become a fairly serious situation regarding mental health. They’re not able to have the best school experience. Their self-esteem has tanked out and they seem to lose themselves,” she said. Dr. Deborah Ellerbusch, LP-T, a clinical psychologist specializing in child, adolescent an family therapy at Prairie View, said for children who do not discuss their issues, parents can watch for warning signs. “Unless your child tells you he or she is being bullied, it can be difficult to figure out if it’s happening.  There are warning signs. You might notice your child acting differently, seeming anxious, not eating or sleeping well, or avoiding things he or she usually enjoys,” she said. Koop said children experiencing bullying and have found themselves working through it alone can begin taking positive steps by simply practicing telling an adult or a teacher about their situation.

To read more see this weeks print edition

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Black Out The Stadium T-Shirts On Sale Today

Posted 10/16/2014

The Hesston Swathers and Golden Plains Credit Union want your help to “Blackout the Stadium” on Friday, Oct. 17, when Hesston takes on Hillsboro.  

Blackout shirts will be for sale at Golden Plains (located at 140 N. Main) beginning Oct. 9 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. for only $5.  

On Friday, Oct. 17, wear your Blackout shirt to the football game and help us “Blackout the Stadium.”  Show your support for the Hesston Swathers and purchase your Blackout shirt beginning October 9 at the credit union.
Golden Plains Credit Union will be making a donation to the Hesston Power Club which supports Hesston High School activities and academics.

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Testing Takes Center Stage At School Board Meeting

Posted 10/16/2014

Jenna Quentin

 Hesston students will be participating in “Break the KITE Day” on Oct. 28. This won't be done outside however, but on the computer with the state online testing interface, the Kansas Interactive Testing Engine (KITE).

“Break the KITE” is an opportunity to test if the state's site is stable with the amount students testing, as well has how the district's system handles it, especially the band width required for listening and video components of the assessments. Teachers will be able to se how well iPads work for testing too.

Curriculum Consultant Darla Smith updated the USD 460 school board at their monthly meeting. While students' results will not be available this year, the district will receive data back from most of the tests. Several tests are pilots or being field tested and will not send data back, such as the multi-disciplinary test for grades 3-8, and history and government for grades 6, 8 and 11.

To read more see this weeks print edition

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