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The Hesston Record
347 B Old Hwy 81
Hesston, KS 67062
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Hesston Record 3.26



Hesston Record 3.26

Hesstonian Keynoting Traumatic Brain Injury Conference

Posted 3/26/2015

By Jackie Nelson

John Byler, a Hesston resident and traumatic brain injury survivor will be keynoting the 2015 Mind Matters Conference on Brain Injury coordinated by the Center for Rural Health. 

“NASA can have Mars; Neurological rehabilitation is the next great frontier,” he said. 

Byler said at the conference, he hopes to bridge the gaps between survivors, caregivers, doctors, insurance companies and drug manufacturers. 

“The heart of the presentation, the recovery team doesn’t take a super-star neurologist.  It is a team with a multi-disciplinary approach that will win the day,” he said.

Byler said he has a vision for just such a team on the national scale. 

He realizes his goal for a national organization is lofty, but his family has a history of achieving lofty ambitions.

“My grandmother, Edna Ruth Byler, started 10,000 Villages out of the trunk of her car because she had an idea,” he said. 

Byler continued, “My big idea is BISON.  It is an acronym for Brain Injury Support; Operation and Neurological.  

“This will be a group of people helping streamline the paperwork.  The paperwork is too much for healthy people; it is way too much for us,” he said. 

Byler said BISON, which he hopes to have a division in each state, can be a hands and feet organization and the Brain Injury Association of America can focus on efforts in Washington DC. 

“Susan Conners has transformed the organization into a politicized group and becoming a lobby. We want to help supplement what they’re doing,” he said. 

BISON funds, Byler said, would be used to enhance nursing programs, preparing students for dealing with and identifying brain injuries. 

Byler said traumatic brain injuries are on the rise in veterans and experts are beginning to understand the risks of traumatic brain injuries in athletes as well. 

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History Repeats With Lark Trip To National Tournament

Posted 3/26/2015

By Rusty Whitcher 

Perhaps it was lost among the rubble after the infamous tornado left a swath of destruction across Hesston.
But 1990 wasn’t just historical for the weather impact. There was history on the Hesston College sports front as well as that year was the last time the Lark men went to the national tournament. It took 25 years, but this year’s version of the Larks is making a triumphant return to the NJCAA Division II National Championship Tournament being played in Danville, Illinois on the campus of Danville Community College. Hesston played its first game on Wednesday, March 18 against fourth-seeded Des Moines Area Community College. Head Coach Dustin Galyon is a former Lark player, now manning the sidelines.
This year’s trip to nationals marks the fourth time in Hesston College history, the Lark men have made it to the NJCAA version of the “big dance.” Hesston made it three other times, in 1987, 1989 and 1990, all under the helm of Mark Yoder, another former player-turned-coach.  Even then, the playoff picture seemed to muddle year to year as in 1987, all the Larks had to do to qualify was to either sweep Haskell Indian Nations Junior College in the regular season or if they teams split, beat the then-two year school in a one game playoff.
“We were ranked number one in defense,” said Mario Hollowell, a player on the ’87 team. “We were a small team compared to most of the other teams, but we were tough.”
“The most memorable part of or trip to nationals was driving 18 hours to Michigan with 15 people in a 15 passenger van pulling a U-haul trailer,” Yoder said. “We did win one of our three games that year.”

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No. 2 Ranked Des Moines ACC Hands Larks First Tournament Loss

Posted 3/26/2015

By Rusty Whitcher

The last time the Hesston College men’s basketball team made it to the national tournament; none of the current Lark players were even alive.
After winning Region VI, Hesston booked its tickets to Danville, Illinois for the NJCAA Division II National Championship on March 18. The Larks opened play against the No. 2-ranked and fourth seeded Des Moines Area Community College. Frigid shooting doomed the Larks to an 89-53 loss to open the tourney.
Austin Mitchell scored the opening bucket for the contest giving the Larks a 2-0 lead. However it would be the only lead Hesston would have as the Larks couldn’t score for the next 4:44 and DMACC built a 12-2 lead.
“I thought since Feb. 11 on, we have been the aggressor,” Coach Dustin Galyon said. “I thought the first night of the tournament we weren’t aggressive as we could have been. So it looked like everything was a little rushed. That was tough.”
“We were excited to play, but we didn’t make the shots we usually make,” Mitchell said. “I guess we were in a little awe. It was a great experience to go to nationals.”
After a Jake Hansen free throw, cut the lead to 19-13, DMACC went on a 21-6 run over the next 8:19 as the Larks couldn’t buy a basket from the floor. DMACC’s height and athleticism built a 44-20 lead at the half behind 59 percent shooting as Hesston could only 29 percent in the first half.

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Lancing CC Transition Game Hits Larks Full-Force

Posted 3/26/2015

By Rusty Whitcher

Maybe it was fatigue. Maybe it was playing on the biggest stage. Maybe it was the physicality of the tournament.
Whatever it was, it left the Hesston College men’s basketball team in the lurch for the second half of game two at the NJCAA Division II national tournament when the Larks were outran by Lansing Community College 101-84.
The first half was a furious mix of transition basketball as both teams raced up and down the court. Hesston opened the game with a quick 4-0 lead before Lansing answered. The first half featured nine ties and 12 lead changes with Lansing a 44-40 lead into the halftime locker room.
“I thought the first game as a whole we weren’t very good,” Coach Dustin Galyon said. “The second game I was really proud of how hard we played. Lansing really over helped on dribble penetration so we got a lot of good looks, almost too good and we just couldn’t hit them.”
The second half saw Lansing continue to push the ball up the floor as a slight drought doomed the Larks to never regain control of the contest. Lansing scorched the nets for 63 percent shooting in the second stanza, while Hesston shot 47 percent in the half.
“I really thought Lansing did to us what we’ve done to other teams,” Galyon said. “At the tournament, you go with the date who brought you and we’ve been a team that offensively we’re going to push in transition and if we don’t get something, Jordan Tanner’s going to score or we’re going to hit threes. They really limited transition and we didn’t hit threes. At the tournament you can’t have one and not the other.”
“I think we came out ready to play,” Austin Mitchell said “But we just didn’t get back in transition and get the stops we needed. We scored the ball a lot better. Overall I was happy with how we did as a team.”

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Council Comes To Decision On Weaver Street Project.

Posted 3/26/2015

By Record Staff

The Hesston City Council split a vote, three in favor, two opposed, to putting the Weaver Street project out for bid. 

Councilmen Lee Birch and Pat Moore opposed the measure while councilmen Jason Jones, Brad Unruh and John Reimer voted in favor to “approve the project going to bid as presented for concrete and asphalt, 34-feet, to take to bid and homeowners to be counseled on trees removal, if desired.  We need to be on high-alert to accept bids and get the job started this year.  I don’t know that blindly accepting this project this big until we see the different parameters. We also ought to have Jim [Erb, Street Superintendent] assess bids we are offered.”  The motion was proposed by Reimer. 

John Riggs of Riggs Associates in Lindsborg was present at the meeting to provide additional input on the issue of trees in the easement. 

Wayne Scritchfield with Kirkham Michael, an expert on concrete and street projects, was also present to answer questions and give his opinion on the project. 

Weaver Street resident Brad Burkholder said he would volunteer to have his trees cut for the project.

“My trees need to come out – so I’ve already told Gary [Emry, City Administrator] I’m OK with the trees being yanked,” he said. 

Riggs’ initial recommendation was to narrow the street to 30-feet to increase the trees’ chances of survival. 

He added if the trees remain or removed, they have significant monetary value. 

“These things, in an urban setting, do have considerable financial value.  It takes a special appraiser based on a number of factors.  A mature pin oak has a pretty high value.  The current square-inch value is about $50 to $60 for those trees in that condition.  Those could run thousands of dollars,” he said. 

Councilman John Reimer said as a Hesston resident, while he did not live on  the street as a tax-payer he felt he had a vested interest in the trees and the aesthetic of Weaver Street.   He said, however, if homeowners, like Burkholder, wanted their trees removed, the City had the opportunity to honor those requests. 

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