Your browser version is outdated. We recommend that you update your browser to the latest version.

The Hesston Record
347 B Old Hwy 81
Hesston, KS 67062
(620) 327-4831

This Week's Issue:

Hesston Record 12.18



Hesston Record 12.18

Ag Week Special: Getting To Know A Kansas Staple

Posted 3/14/2013

One of the staples of the Kansas agricultural economy is wheat.  Found in nearly all everyday products, wheat is a major part of the American diet.

Sowing, growing and harvest are cycles familiar to many Kansans.

However, farmer Craig Ewe said while wheat is found all around Kansas, there seems to b a disconnect between consumers and producers.

“One thing I would want people to realize, that ends up on your table eventually.  If it doesn’t come in, eventually you’re not going to eat,” he said.

One of the staples of the Kansas agricultural economy is wheat.  Found in nearly all everyday products, wheat is a major part of the American diet.

Sowing, growing and harvest are cycles familiar to many Kansans.

However, farmer Craig Ewe said while wheat is found all around Kansas, there seems to b a disconnect between consumers and producers.

“One thing I would want people to realize, that ends up on your table eventually.  If it doesn’t come in, eventually you’re not going to eat,” he said.

Wheat is a low-maintenance crop by most agricultural standards.

“You mostly pay attention to the varieties and how they are performing year in and year out.  That’s mainly in the breeding,” he said.

For many farmers, genetics is a key factor in determining how a crop will fair.

“We go some on disease resistance and, again, yield – how they are going to do,” he said.

In the Harvey County area, many farmers are planting only one type of wheat.

“It’s all pretty much hard red winter wheat. There used to be some white wheat. But that’s gone by the way,” he said.

Winter wheat has one of the longest growing seasons of nearly any crop. 

“Typically we plant in late September through October. Some guys like to go a little earlier in late September.  I usually shoot for the first of October,” he said.

In the case of Ewe, when planting, area farmers, in an effort to preserve top-soil, save themselves the time and effort to plow before planting.

“We are strictly no-till. So we go in behind corn or soybeans,” he said.

As a no-till operation, Ewe is able to get his wheat crop into the ground relatively quickly.

“As soon as the corn comes off in September, we let it set and then go right into the stubble and sow right into it and put on a little fertilizer.  If I go after beans, it can be a matter of days putting wheat in,” he said.

During the winter, wet soil conditions can be detrimental to the harvest.

“I like it a little dryer though the winter. You want enough moisture to keep it going.  Although, if it gets too wet in the winter it will leach the nutrients away from the wheat.” 

Even though this winter has lacked significant snow or rainfall. Ewe is still confident in this year’s crop.

“This winter has been a little on the dry side, but it’s been OK so far,”