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The Hesston Record
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Hesston, KS 67062
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June 22, 2017 The Hesston RecordJune 22, 2017 The Hesston Record

Crowe Likes Pace of Small-Town Officer

Posted 3/1/2017

By Blake Spurney

Hesston Record Staff

New Hesston police officer Joshua Crowe likes to patrol in a small town because it allows him more time to talk to people.

"It's just go, go, go," he said about patrolling in Salina. "I can meet more people [here] in the community."

Crowe said he often answered 25 calls during a shift in Salina. He witnessed lots of drug activity there and sporadic gang activity.

"There's quite a bit more chases," he said about his old job. "My last chase wasn't the best experience."

A Hesston police cruiser Crowe was driving caught fire after a chase Jan. 26 in what was just his third week on the job.

Crowe was involved in one short chase in Salina that ended with a wreck and subsequent seizure of three grams of methamphetamine. He chased the suspect for 1 1/2 blocks before he lost track of him. A police dog tracked the suspect to a basement stairwell.

"That was nice to get off the street," he said about the drugs.

Crowe has worked one stabbing, and the case is still pending. He hasn't yet had to testify as an officer.

"There were a few homicides when I was there," he said. "I was asleep luckily when they all occurred."

Before working in Salina, he spent 2 1/2 years in Minneapolis. Originally from Anthony, Crowe wanted to work in Hesston to be closer to his family. He previously applied for a job with Hesston police in 2015.

"I like the department," he said. "I like everybody I work with. I went to the academy with [Jacob] Garver. I just liked Hesston. It's a neat little town."

Most residents likely haven't had much contact with Crowe on duty because he works the 11 p.m.-7 a.m. shift. He often visits with people when he gets coffee at Casey's. He enjoys the aspect of community policing. Otherwise, most of his time is spent driving the streets of Hesston.

To read more, see this weeks print edition

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Hesston PD Provides Support At Triple Homicide

Posted 3/1/2017

Hesston Record Staff

Hesston Police officer Joshua Crowe was one of the first officers on the scene at the triple homicide in Newton in the early hours of Thursday morning.

Crowe, who has been on the Hesston Police department for only a month (see his profile on page 4), was working third shift when the 911 call and dispatch came out.

“I was initially there with the rest of the first responders. I got there within a couple minutes of everyone else,” said Crowe.

Crowe was part of the initial tactical team approaching the house.

“We went in with very little information,” he said.

Hesston Police Chief Doug Schroeder said officers continuously train for circumstances like what Crowe and other responders faced. 

“We train so that they can put together what information they have and remain safe to reduce further casualties or fatalities,” said Schroeder.

Crowe said in situations like the one in Newton, officers always exercise the utmost caution when approaching the scene. 

“If you’re on scene, do as you’re told. We don’t know who has guns and who is a victim. You’re going to be handcuffed and shouted at. Don’t make any sudden movements; you’re going to be OK.

“If we go in and make considerations and give people opportunities then we could get hurt or they could get hurt,” he said.

In this instance, Crowe said officers were also challenged with a large geographical area to cover.

“We might not have had enough people, but we made due with what we had,” he said.

Schroeder said at this point in the investigation Hesston PD is “on the outskirts of the investigation.” 

“Our role at this point is pretty well done, unless we are asked,” he said.

Hesston Police turned over electronic evidence to the Kansas Bureau of Investigations, including recordings from the Hesston police vehicle.

“The next big question on the horizon is what’s going on. Why are we having this influx of crime and significant violent crime?” said Schroeder. 

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Walkabout Gallery To Feature HMS Artists

Posted 3/1/2017

By Jacquelyn Nelson

Hesston Record Staff

The Walkabout Gallery will be featuring,for the 

first time, art ofstudents at Hesston Middle School.

Students’ art will be on display through the month of March in the lower level of the Hesston Wellness Center.  Twenty-five hand-drawn landscapes will be on display, supplied by Leah Gaeddert and her fifth and sixth grade art classes.

“They contacted us and asked if we had artwork.  I thought it would be perfect. It is one-point perspective drawings from around the world. I wanted to pick a variety so it’s like a walk around the world,” she said.

Student Jamie Krehbiel chose a remote location in China as the subject of her piece.

“I picked the Rainbow Mountains. I was really colorful and I thought I could include a lot of colors,” she said.

Krehbiel added, prior to the project, she was unaware such a stunning landscape existed.

Artist Supna Patel also featured Chinese landscapes, however, focused on the most iconic imagery, the Great Wall.

“I’ve always really liked structures and have always liked the Great Wall of China. I’ve never really done anything on it and thought this would be the perfect time to do something on it,” she said.

While many artists chose readily identifiable places, Paul Barthelem created his own landscape for the gallery.

“It’s no specific place. I looked at a few pictures and I wanted to draw a sunset with a reflection,” he said.

Each artist spent hours researching, drawing and coloring their pieces using colored pencils.

“I gave them a really short demonstration on how to use colored pencils and they took it and ran with it.  I like the way they took it and made it theirs,” said Gaeddert.

The three artists, with their wide variety of landscapes and personal preferences all faced unique challenges with their pieces. 

To read more, see this weeks print edition

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